montano.jpg

Eduardo Montano Jr. and his attorneys, Daisy Flores and Dennis McCarthy, during Monday's sentencing hearing.

Again and again, Matthew Misener’s family members stood in court Monday and told Eduardo Montano Jr. they have no idea what was said to get him to kill their loved one, but Misener was a good man who loved his children.

Misener’s fiance, Nicole Chacon, said no matter what, Misener’s children “will know the truth” and she hopes they end up hating their mother, Misener’s former wife, Georgina, 33.

Monday afternoon was Montano’s sentencing hearing in Graham County Superior Court.

Earlier this month, Montano pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and conspiracy to commit aggravated assault in connection with Misener’s death on Feb. 10. Georginia Misener is awaiting trial on first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit first-degree murder charges.

According to court documents, Montano, a Tucson resident, told officials he and Georgina Misener conspired to keep Matthew Misener away from a court hearing by placing him “in reasonable apprehension of imminent serious physical injury” and if that failed, he’d cause serious physical injury to him.

Montano admitted he drove to Greenlee County and laid in wait for the intended victim, a Morenci mine mechanic, on Highway 191 on Feb. 10. He confessed to shooting Misener with a 9 mm handgun multiple times, killing him.

Under the terms of his plea agreement, Montano agreed to serve 25 years for second-degree murder and a consecutive 8.75 years for the conspiracy count. Graham County Judge Michael Peterson imposed that sentence after hearing from Chacon and Misener’s mother, brother and sister.

Christy Perkins, Misener’s sister, said she hopes Montano has remorse for what he’s done to not only her family, but to his own.

“We still have yet to see his children and all we want to do is embrace them, tell them how much he loved them and that he was fighting to see them,” Perkins said.

Sean Misener, the victim’s brother, said he has a lot of emotions “raging through him” and he hopes Montano’s emotions eat at him from the inside out while he’s in prison.

“I hope he doesn’t make it out,” he said.

He was afraid to say too much more, he told the judge, because he’d probably get into trouble.

Visibly shaking and crying, Misener’s mom, Jeanne Anderson, said she is still in a state of shock, cries everyday and is troubled by visions of the murder.

She told the judge, “I despise him. I hope he spends the rest of his life in jail and never has the opportunity to see daylight.”

Moments later, she added, “I need the other one put away just as bad.”

Clifton police said at the time of her arrest they’d found electronic communications between her and Montano coordinating the murder.

Load comments